March 2022 – text only

A text only version of the Quarterly Report infographics.

Care and protection overview

How a child might move through, and be supported by, our services depending on their needs:

  • report of concern is when a member of the public or a professional notifies Oranga Tamariki that a child or young person may be at risk of harm.
  • If we're worried that a child's wellbeing could be at risk, an assessment or (if more serious) an investigation takes place.
  • A family group conference may then be needed to see what whānau or family support the child needs. A plan is then developed for the child.
  • In some situations, a child or young person may have to be placed in care. This could be someone from their wider family or whānau or an approved and trained caregiver.
  • When ready, a child or young person may leave care. This might mean returning to their family or whānau – or when they turn 18, they may live independently but still receive support.

A child or young person may leave our services at any of the stages above. They may also re-enter. 

Overview main page

Care and protection statistics

Tamariki or children and rangatahi or young people we have worked with during the 12 months to 31 March 2022:

  • 68,500 reports of concern involving 50,800 individual children and young people.
  • 35,900 assessments or investigations carried out involving 30,300 individual children and young people.
  • 7,250 family group conferences held involving 5,350 individual children and young people.
  • 740 entries to care involving 710 individual children and young people.
  • 1,300 exits from care involving 1,250 individual children and young people.

Who we're working with

Tamariki or children and rangatahi or young people in care as at 31 March 2022:

  • 4,800 children and young people are currently in the Care and Protection custody of the Chief Executive.
  • Gender:
    • 46% Female
    • 53% Male
  • Ethnicity:
    • 57% Māori
    • 11% Māori and Pacific
    • 6% Pacific
    • 26% NZ Euro & Other
  • Age: 
    • 4% 0–1
    • 19% 25
    • 23% 69
    • 26% 1013
    • 27% 14+

Note: Overall percentages may not always add to 100 percent due to rounding. Care numbers (including entries and exits to care) do not include warrants (s39, s40, s42, s48) as they are generally shorter than five days.

Care and protection statistics main page

Youth Justice overview

The infographic shows how a young person might move through and be supported by our services depending on their needs:

  • Police make an assessment and decide whether to refer a young person following an offence.
  • Family Group Conference may be needed to see what whānau or family support the young person needs. A plan is then developed for the young person.
  • youth justice residence provides a secure place for young people to stay who are in custody of the Chief Executive following arrest, remand or sentence.
  • A young person may leave Youth Justice when they've completed an FGC plan; charges are dismissed; get transferred to District or High Court; receive an order from the Youth Court or on turning 18.

A young person may leave our service at any of the stages above. They may also re-enter.

Overview main page

Youth Justice statistics

Young people or rangatahi we have worked with during the 12 months to 31 March 2022:

  • 3,550 family group conferences held involving 1,700 individual young people.
  • 790 entries to custody involving 460 individual young people.
  • 760 exits from custody involving 460 individual young people.

Who we're working with

Young people or rangatahi in custody as at 31 March 2022:

  • 140 young people are currently in the Youth Justice custody of the Chief Executive
    • 20 Supervision with Residence
    • 120 Custodial Remand/other
  • Gender:
    • 9% Female
    • 91% Male
  • Ethnicity:
    • 73% Māori
    • 13% Māori and Pacific
    • 6% Pacific
    • 8% NZ Euro & Other
  • Age:
    • 4% 1013
    • 20% 14
    • 24% 15
    • 18% 16
    • 34% 17+

Note: Overall percentages may not add to 100 percent due to rounding. Youth Justice in the custody of the CE includes rangatahi or young people in remand and those on a supervision with residence order. Youth Justice custody of the CE may be overestimated due to delayed recording. Please note the figure can also fluctuate noticeably on a daily basis.

Additional young people we are working with

who are not in custody as at 31 March 2022:

  • 370 Additional young people Oranga Tamariki is working with
    • 40 Supervision
    • 10 Supervision with Activity
    • 320 Monitored FGC Plan
  • Gender:
    • 11% Female
    • 89% Male
  • Ethnicity:
    • 67% Māori
    • 8% Māori and Pacific
    • 4% Pacific
    • 22% NZ Euro & Other
  • Age: 
    • 4% 1013
    • 11% 14
    • 21% 15
    • 22% 16
    • 43% 17+

Note: Overall percentages may not add to 100 percent due to rounding. The number of 'additional young people we are working with’ and ‘Youth Justice custody’ as well as the breakdowns of these figures are all rounded so may not add up to the same number.

 

Youth justice statistics main page

Transition overview

  • Preparing to transition to adulthood. Young people or rangatahi in care and protection or youth justice and between the ages of 15 and 18 are supported to prepare to leave our care
  • Planning hui. A social worker will hui with a young person or rangatahi to outline the support available to them and help them develop a plan on how they can achieve their goals, aspirations and moemoea. Family or whānau and hāpu may be involved in this hui. Young people can choose to have a Transition Worker support them to achieve their goals

  • Building a trusted relationship. Transition Workers are provided through iwi, Māori and NGO partners in the community. Whakawhanaungatanga may be the foundation of this relationship. The Transition Workers are there to walk alongside young people, connect young people to their identity, culture, whakapapa, strengths, talents, whānau, hāpu and iwi and to support them to develop their life skills to achieve their goals

  • A stable place to live. For some rangatahi or young people remaining with or returning to live with a caregiver will give them the stability they need to thrive. We can support young people to stay with their caregiver until they turn 21 years old

  • Supported Accommodation. Young people or rangatahi may require a bit more support and manaaki in their journey to adulthood. Supported accommodation helps bridge the gap to independence by providing young people with opportunities to experience and learn in a safe and supported environment

  • Advice and Assistance Line. Up until the age of 25 rangatahi or young people can call 0800 55 89 89 for advice and assistance such as: finding somewhere to live, enrolling in education or training, applications for employment or work readiness schemes, accessing health and counselling services and/or providing financial assistance to support them to move towards independence.

A rangatahi or young person may access some, none or all of these services.

 

Overview main page

Transition statistics

 Young people or rangatahi we have worked with during the 12 months to 31 March 2022:

  • 1,300 young people were eligible to remain with or return to their caregiver, of which 60 (4%) of young people used this service.
  • 140 supported accomodation placements were available. 

Who we're working with

  • 910 young people (60% of those eligible) were referred to a Transition Worker
  • 520 additional young people who were referred to a Transition Worker.

Of those referred:

  • Gender:
    • 43% Female
    • 56% Male
  • Ethnicity:
    • 56% Māori
    • 9% Māori and Pacific
    • 6% Pacific
    • 29% NZ Euro & Other
  • Age:
    • 2%   15
    • 12% 16
    • 22% 17
    • 26% 18
    • 38% 19+

*Note: Overall percentages of demographic breakdowns may not always add to 100 percent due to rounding.


Please note that the Transition Service is under development so visuals and ways of measuring may change in future deliveries.

Transition statistics main page

Published: July 7, 2022