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Gráinne encourages whānau to celebrate Children's Day - Te Rā o ngā Tamariki

Published on
27 Feb 2020
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Gráinne Moss

Let's celebrate Children's Day

Kia ora tatou koutou

Every day the world celebrates all sorts of international awareness days, from the International Day of Peace to Zero Discrimination Day, World Mental Health Day and even Talk like a Pirate Day. 

While these awareness days are all interesting, the day I think clearly brings the most joy and aroha is Children’s Day - Te Rā o ngā Tamariki. Children’s Day is held every year on the first Sunday of March, which this year is Sunday, 1 March. It’s our national day to celebrate children, and to share ideas and resources about how we can enhance their lives.

Get involved with your whānau

Now in its 20th year, Children’s Day has always been driven by communities throughout Aotearoa. Events and activities are run by local groups such as councils, non-government organisations, churches, libraries and schools. They range from teddy bears’ picnics and superhero dress-up parties, to family expos and councils organising events and activities.

Not only is it a great opportunity to take your whānau out for a day of fun, but you can also connect with people and organisations in your community who work hard to support children and young people. 

Check out what’s happening in your area on the Children’s Day website

There are also some fantastic free resources you can download on the Children’s Day website to use with tamariki at any time. These include print-out animal masks, chatterboxes and puppets, and other fun colouring-in activities.

Please encourage your colleagues and friends to celebrate the day; and if you are posting any pictures or clips on social media don’t forget to tag them #ChildrensDayNZ 

Our shared responsability to help children thrive

As much as Children’s Day is a celebration of children, it is also an opportunity for all of us to think about our responsibility to support tamariki in New Zealand.

A recent survey found that the protection of children is the top concern of 71 per cent of kiwis. Whether you’re a parent or not, we can all help tamariki thrive. Here are three ways we can help put tamariki first every day:

  • Kōrero - Talking with tamariki and really listening to what they say makes them feel heard and builds their confidence.
  • Aroha - You can never spoil a child with too much aroha. Showing warmth and affection builds trust and positive self-esteem.
  • Whānau - Safe, loving, supportive whānau and communities surrounding tamariki will help them to grow and flourish.

 

Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou katoa

Gráinne Moss
Oranga Tamariki Chief Executive

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