Quarterly Reporting

Quarterly Report - December 2019

YOUTH JUSTICE

We are committed to supporting young people, whānau and victims of youth crime to restore their mana. 

The graphs below show how we are performing across several measures. 

Note: 17 year olds became a part of the Youth Justice System as at 1 July 2019. This is denoted in the charts as a dotted line. Please note this means that the populations before and after the line are not comparable as more young people are included in the latest quarter. The inclusion of 17 years may impact on the trends below as 17 year olds may offend in different ways and may have a longer history of offence.

Outcomes framework goal - More young people stop offending before adulthood.
Support following offending 2

Re-engagement for those with Youth Justice history

The proportion of young people referred to Oranga Tamariki youth justice once and not subsequently re-referred to us (blue section of bar) continues to steadily grow. There has been a decrease in the number of young people who have had multiple engagements with Oranga Tamariki in the past but no new contact in the quarter. This has been driven by the inclusion of 17 year olds into the Youth Justice System from 1 July 2019. 

Graph text description - Re-engagement for those with Youth Justice history

This chart shows the number of rangatahi who have not had any engagement with Youth Justice in the quarter as a proportion of the total rangatahi we have previously engaged with who are still eligible for Youth Justice.

Of all applicable aged rangatahi in the latest quarter:
- We have engaged with 769 rangatahi who had only one previous family group conference.
- We have not engaged with 584 rangatahi who had multiple previous family group conferences.

Reoffending history 2

FGC history for young people with current FGC

The number of FGCs held overall has increased this quarter. This increase is being driven by the inclusion of 17 year olds. Young people aged 17 and over have had more than a 40 percent increase in FGCs in comparison to the previous quarter. Young people aged 17 and above are also more likely to have had a previous FGC than young people 16 and under. 

Graph text description - FGC history for young people with current FGC

This chart shows the number of rangatahi who have had a family group conference in the quarter, split by the total number of family group conferences they have had in their lifetime, over the past two years.

Of all rangatahi who had an family group conference in the latest quarter
- 329 have had one family group conference.
- 232 have had two to four family group conferences.
- 132 have had five to nine family group conferences.
- 61 have had ten or more family group conferences.

What is a Family Group Conference (FGC)?

A Youth Justice Family Group Conference gives a young person along with their whānau, victims and professionals, a chance to help find solutions when they have offended.

There are three types of Youth Justice Family Group Conferences: an FGC for children who offend, an Intention to Charge FGC, and a Court Ordered FGC. 

Outcomes framework goal - More young people are safely managed in the least restrictive placement appropriate.
Less restrictive placements 2

Custodial Placements in Youth Justice

The number of young people in custody has increased 11 percent in the latest quarter. This increase has occurred in both those 17 and above as well as those below 17 years old. In the latest quarter young people aged 17 and over made up 36 percent of those in police custody. Where possible Oranga Tamariki strives to keep young people out of police custody as much as possible. 

Graph text description - Custodial Placements in Youth Justice

This chart shows the number of remand placements over the quarter by type of placement. This is shown by quarter for the last two years.

In the latest quarter:
- 67 rangatahi had a community based placement.
- 326 rangatahi had a residence placement.
- 58 rangatahi were in police custody at some point.

What are the different types of placements?

There are several different types of youth justice placements. These can include: 

Residence: A youth justice residence provides a safe and secure place for young people to stay who are in the custody of the Chief Executive following arrest, remand or sentence. Residences are locked facilities that provide 24 hour containment and care. 

Community based placement: A young person in the custody of the Chief Executive can be placed in the community if their circumstances do not require them to be in secure residence. Community based placements can include group remand homes, supervised group homes, and family homes among others. 

Police Custody: A young person can be held securely by the Police immediately following arrest or on custodial remand whilst a court case is progressing. This can include those in custody of the Police or in the custody of the Chief Executive.

 

Shorter placements 2

Average days on Custodial Remand

Custodial remand placements in residence are considerably longer, on average, than community placements. The durations fluctuate over time, often due to one or two outlier cases. Overall, the average length of time spent on custodial remand this quarter was shorter than the most other averages observed over the past two years despite the 1 July 2019 inclusion of 17 year olds into the youth justice system. 

Graph text description - Average days on Custodial Remand

This chart shows the average length in days of each of the remand placement types, by quarter for the past two years.

In the latest quarter:
- The average length of placement for a community based placement was 12.6 days.
- The average length of placement for a residence placement was 34.2 days.
- The average length of time spent in Police Custody was 1.4 days.

Red Placement27
Status of case 2

Status of cases after first court appearance

Shares of each outcome type have fluctuated slightly over time. For the vast majority of cases bail is the main status after the first court appearance. On average, 399 cases are closed each quarter. 

Graph text description - Status of cases after first court appearance

This chart shows the number of cases finalised in the quarter by the status of their release after the first court appearance. This is shown by quarter for the past two years.

In the latest quarter after the first appearance before a judge for each case:
- 32 rangatahi were released on custodial remand.
- 58 rangatahi were released on custodial remand then later went onto bail.
- 387 rangatahi were released on bail.
- 22 rangatahi were released into the community.

Final status of bail 2

Final status of first bail

The inclusion of 17 year olds into the Youth Justice system has increased the number of cases that had their first appearance this quarter. The biggest growth was seen in those who stayed on bail after offending. Despite this, those who stayed on bail with no offence still make up over 50 percent of all statuses for the quarter. 

Graph text description - Final status of first bail

This chart shows the success on bail for each case which had bail in the quarter for the past two years.

Of the cases that had some bail during the quarter:
- 270 did not offend and stayed on bail throughout the quarter or until sentencing.
- 95 stayed on bail despite committing an additional offence.
- 112 offended and were moved from bail into custodial remand.
- 22 did not offend but were moved from bail into custodial remand.